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Darwinism & Digital Transformation – Adapt or Die

Darwinism and the Digital Transformation Age

The Theory
The so-called ‘theory’ of evolution as we all know is not a theory at all, but rather a scientific explanation of our entire existence which is supported by a wealth of evidence solidly rooted in experimental rigour provided by a wide variety of agencies, including paleontology, geology, genetics and developmental biology.

We now unambiguously understand that; “natural selection is the gradual process by which biological traits become either more or less common in a population as a function of the effect of inherited traits on the differential reproductive success of organisms interacting with their environment. It is a key mechanism of evolution.” [1]

Recently, I was thinking about the whole natural selection thing and how this manifests itself in a multitude of adaptations, evolved over eons. Given time and the right conditions, almost any feature could become advantageous and ultimately prevalent in an ecosystem or society. The thing with natural selection is that it happens imperceptibly slowly. In evolutionary terms, time is not just of the essence, it is the essence or medium through which change travels, rarely in a direct or pre-determined fashion and not always for the good. It just is.

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Arguably, at the heart of it all is the fact that all organisms exhibit some sort of variation, possibly created through a random mutation or maybe through an adaptation to change. This individual trait could then be subject to environmental conditions which in turn could enhance or diminish the advantage leading to an increase or decrease in the natural populace depending on their ability to exploit that advantage. It’s interesting to note that mutations can even be deliberately induced in order to adapt to a rapidly changing environment.

You may have observed that some important corollaries of the previous paragraph could be;
1. There is chance of a random mutation,
2. Mutations can be forced,
3. Mutations can occur as a result of interaction with the environment.

I have deliberately reiterated this point to help develop the next piece of narrative, i.e. how can we link a well understood area of scientific study (Darwinism) with a business’s desire and ability to digitally transform.

OK, let’s try this on for size.

1. Take the example where an individual, say some bright spark takes up a position of responsibility within an equally bright spark-type company. A chance encounter one might speculate. I am stating that this is analogous to a chance mutation in nature, at least from the point of view of the business.

2. Take another example where the company is well aware of its current operating environment and has a desire to modify its behaviour to its advantage. This, second analogy is aligned with the forced mutation concept. For whatever reason some internal driving force is pushing for change and ultimately a better position in the food chain, or business sector.

3. The last examples is where change is forced upon an entity by external, non-controllable factors. In nature this could be climate change, or an unnaturally high increase in predation etc. Whatever the cause, the only solution is to adapt, improvise and overcome; or face disaster.

Sound familiar? Well maybe. It guess you could also say that sounds a little far-fetched, but I’m still pretty certain I can build this out into something viable. How so? Well, there are steps involved in digital transformation, just as there are steps to evolve. Equally, there are typically a set of actors and processes involved in digital transformation, all of which are pretty obvious, when you think about it.

The Team
1. The visionaries (actors), i.e. the ones with the idea behind the change and often the instigators of change. We can see the visionary as coming from within the organisation, or someone new joining the organisation to effect change. The response is the same in that the organisation is on the receiving end of a forced mutation.

2. The ‘not so visionaries’ (reactors), i.e. the ones who react (usually too late) to some change forced upon them by external factors, such as market, employment or economic forces. From a digital transformation point-of-view these people are generally ineffective at best and can often be obstructers to change.

3. The changers, i.e. the ones who will implement the change, the adapters, the improvisers and the people who overcome difficulty in the face of the forced transformation, regardless of whether it has been decreed by a visionary or forced by circumstance. This is the change team and we will hear more about them later, but essentially they are the people involved with change usually adopt some method, i.e. a process by which change will come about to the ultimate benefit of the organisation. In Darwinian terms this is something akin to natural selection.

The Process
Generally in digital transformation there is the  benefit of being able to predetermine a roadmap with ideas, processes, tools and data. This helps to guide and smooth the change management process or natural selection in Darwinian terms. Fortunately, such changes are not completely left to the laws of nature, but are subject to a degree of intelligence and planning. It could be argued of course that natural selection is also guided by intelligent forces, but that’s another story. Hopefully the analogy is somewhat clear by now.

Change comes in many forms and is usually a force for the better although it is rarely welcomed. Perhaps it is time for you to think about where you are on the road to digital transformation and how this has come about. Are you truly ready for the digital age and have you got the vision and process to see it through?