Remote Working: Office Not Required

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Remote Working in Modern Times

One of the workplace topics that I have seen hotly debated on occasion, is the issue of remote working. Can it truly work? Are employees genuinely motivated? How can quality, working relationships be established and maintained? And so on. I have been involved with remote working and managing remote teams for a number of years, but I was still intrigued when I received a copy of ‘Remote: Office Not Required‘, written by 37 signals co-founders Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson. I knew of the company and their products, and that they have a very successful business run entirely by remote workers.

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I have long since finished the book and have only just now gotten around to blogging about the concept of the remote worker. It is not my intention to review the book here, suffice to say it is an exceptionally easy read and has a fluidity of prose rarely associated with tech-related books.

It currently has four stars on Amazon, and what could have been a potentially mundane subject to write about, is actually a well-crafted, enlightening and sometimes an amusing read.

So what’s the big deal? Why does the concept of remote working elicit widely differing responses and why do some people say they could never remote work whilst others are highly successful, mini-managers? The reason is really simple, it’s all a matter of trust. You have to trust your colleagues and trust yourself to fulfil your end of the deal.

What do I mean? Simply, you have to trust that you have the drive, motivation, desire and ability to be able to work away from the rest of your team, not on your own, but not co-located either. I really believe it’s that simple. Colleagues should be assured that you are the type of person that given a lull in the general day-to-day activities, will look for something to do, an improvement in process, finishing off the operations manual from 2 projects ago, or simply chasing down customer responses to emails.

Still, there is one area where I think remote working is lacking. Ironically enough it’s the tech needed for a typical remote team operation. It’s definitely not up-to-scratch in certain areas, but not to the point where the experience is unpleasant’. It’s just clear to me that it can be improved upon. Although tools such as Skype, TeamViewer and Join.me have improved by leaps-and-bounds over the last few years, I still find that they are easily affected by bandwidth/signal/wi-fi issues and in some cases lack a clear, intuitive interface.

With 4G availability and coverage ever expanding, and devices offering ever more facilities through powerful, rich apps this should be the impetus telecoms companies need to provide a true internet society with always on, always connected and always secure technology. Fast, secure, intuitive apps are key components to happy, remote workers.

37 Signals’ secret to success is pretty evident from the manner in which they openly recruited remote developers from all over the globe. By ensuring that each member of the team had appropriate tools and a solid service provider, there are few, if any complaints in the book that the lack of tools and/or suitable internet connection hindered their progress in any way. It’s also clear in the book that the interview process is rigorous and aimed at weeding out candidates that don’t suit the remote worker profile they have studiously crafted over the lifetime of their business.

And the secret for you as a remote worker? This excellent article by Zapier outlines a number of traits that remote workers need to possess in order for them to be successful and happy. They include more obvious things like being trustworthy and having an ability to communicate effectively via the written word, but also, and I think, just as important is having a local support system. This means of course having a life outside of work where interaction with people occurs on a level different to Skype and TeamViewer conversations. Clearly all digital work does indeed make Jack a dull boy.

Proverbs aside, it is a vital point and one not to be taken lightly if you are thinking about entering the remote working arena. Having a good network of friends and family is really necessary to help fulfill the void potentially created by the remote working environment.

I have found that working remotely can be, and is, just as rewarding as going to the office. Having successfully managed a number of remote teams I can say with a sense of achievement and satisfaction that being co-located isn’t that important, but having the right attitude is.