Moving to the Cloud – Part 1 of 3

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Part One – Defining the Hybrid Cloud

Earlier this year when I blogged ‘ten trends to influence IT in the next five years‘, one of the trends I mentioned has been written about on quite a few occasions in the last few months in various web articles and white papers. That particular trend is the use of the ‘Hybrid Cloud’ and it seems to be increasingly catching the attention of the tech evangelists who are keen to spread the word and radicalise the non-believers as I discovered in a recent Cloudshare webinar.

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A little more research on the topic led me to discover that there is a sort of reluctance to adopt cloud (development) initiatives in general. Like most people I had just assumed that cloud-based architectures were creating a new technology storm and in a few years almost everything would be built, developed, hosted and run in a multitude of geographical locations by thousands of VM instances, created and destroyed in seconds. It appears this may not be the case and I find that seven months later, (that’s a long time in IT), the transition has simply not happened, or to be more precise, not at the ‘rate’ expected by cloud aficionados who have been talking about a grandiose move of technology in that direction for the last few years.

My gut feeling is that in general, cloud computing in the tech community is still not a well understood concept, at least from a ‘development tool’, point-of-view and this has logically hindered the move away from traditional development to cloud-centric infrastructures and environments. I have spent some time reading about the pros and cons of moving development to a cloud-based solution and whilst I am a avid supporter of the concept, the best approach for an organisation isn’t always straightforward and will almost certainly involve one of the toughest challenges that can be faced in IT, a cultural change in the workplace and a paradigm shift in the mindset of the developers.

To make a move to the cloud for development and test purposes, people have to think about doing things in a different way. There are other potential barriers, but this is likely to be the one that poses the greatest threat to starting out on the road to eventual development, deployment and testing in the cloud. In general Gartner defines a hybrid cloud service as a cloud computing service that is composed of some combination of private, public and community cloud services, from different service providers [1]. Whilst many of the large public cloud service providers also provide a private cloud facility, I expect that many organisations still prefer to provide their own private cloud implementation since this appears to give a higher degree of security, or at the very least facilitates the storage of data in a local datacentre.

There are quite a few benefits of a hybrid cloud but the obvious one is that it enables the owner take advantage of the larger resources that a public cloud might offer, but still store and maintain private data in a manner where it should be safe from malicious attack and/or theft. Of course there are some organisations whose entire business could exist in a public cloud, but based on my experience this is still not a concept that businesses are truly happy with and certainly within a lot of enterprise or government organisations there is a preference to at least have their production system hosted in a private cloud.

In summary, my concept of a hybrid cloud is one where an organisation has developed its own private cloud for their production (Prod) system and are happy to use the services of a public cloud to develop, host and run their development (Dev) and test (Test) environments. Really, what I am taking about here is moving each of these infrastructures to a cloud environment and that will form the basis of Part 3 of this blog. Part 2 coming up next, will further elaborate on the widely accepted benefits and introduce some of the negative aspects perceived with cloud computing.