Moving to the Cloud – Part 2 of 3

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Part Two – Hybrid Cloud Benefits

In Part 1, I presented a brief definition of the hybrid cloud and hinted at why it could be a useful instrument for enterprises wishing to move their agile Dev and Test environments to a public cloud, but still retain their Prod systems in a local, private cloud. In Part 2, I will consider a number of key areas where substantial benefit can be leveraged using current cloud technologies and why this should be  considered as a serious move towards a more efficient and secure development strategy. That said, like any IT initiative, cloud computing is not without risks and they too will be considered, leaving the reader to weigh-up the options.

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It is useful to bear in mind from Part 1 that we are primarily considering cloud providers that offer IAAS solutions, consequently entire environments can be provisioned and tested (via automation) in minutes rather than days or hours and that in itself is massive boon. This concept alludes to the ‘end goal’ of this type of cloud-based setup, i.e. the design of infrastructures with automation in mind and not just the introduction of automation techniques to current processes, but that’s a topic for another discussion.

There are obvious economic benefits to be had from using public clouds since Dev, and especially Test environments (in the cloud) do not necessarily need to be provisioned and available 24/7 as they normally are with on-premise environments. From a testing point-of-view, many enterprises have a monthly release cycle for example where the Test environment is much more demand compared to other times of the month. In this case it is possible to envisage a scenario where the Test environment is only instantiated when required and can lie dormant at other times.

The phrase ‘business agility’ has been applied to the way that a hybrid cloud can offer the controls of a private cloud whilst at the same time providing scalability via the public cloud and this is also a prime benefit. A relatively new term in this arena is ‘cloud bursting’. Offered by public clouds this refers to short but highly intensive peaks of activity that are representative of cyclical trends in businesses that see periodic rises and falls in demands for their services. For those business that anticipate this type and intensity of activity, this kind of service can be invaluable.

For the troops on the ground, an HP white paper describes clear benefits to developers and testers; “Cloud models are well suited to addressing developer and tester requirements today. They allow for quick and inexpensive stand-up and teardown of complex development and testing environments. They put hardware resources to work for the development and testing phases that can be repurposed once a project is complete”. [1]

Once properly provisioned and integrated, cloud infrastructures will usually offer faster time-to-market and increased productivity through continuous delivery and test automation, however these particular benefits may take a little time to manifest themselves since implementing full-scale Dev and Test environments with associated IDE and build integrations, and an automated test facility, is a relatively complex exercise requiring a range of skills from code development to domain admin, to QA and release automation.

Clearly to achieve and deliver this kind of flexibility a substantial tool set is required. Additionally, developers need to work harmoniously with operations (admin) in a partnership that has become known as DevOps, and this is what I meant by stating in Part 1 that a new mindset was required. The ultimate goal of adopting cloud based Dev and Test environments is continuous delivery through application release automation. This kind of agile approach is seen as a pipe dream by many enterprises and I believe the current perception is that too many barriers, both physical and cerebral exist to adopting the hybrid cloud model for effective product delivery.

These barriers include the obvious candidates, such as security and privacy in the cloud leading to a potential increase in vulnerability. This can be addressed by commissioning a private cloud for Prod systems and ensuring that any data and code in public clouds is not confidential nor does it compromise the company in any way. Another drawback that is often raised is vendor ‘lock-in’ and this simply relates to the terms and conditions of the cloud provider. With so many companies now offering cloud services, I personally think that ‘shopping around’ can mitigate this risk completely and can actually be a seen as a positive factor instead. Switching between cloud providers is becoming less and less of a problem and this in turn offers up a competitive advantage to the cloud consumer as they move their business to take advantage of lower costs.

I do accept that technical difficulties and associated downtime could form a barrier, but this can be said about any new, large tech venture. Since a large tool set is required and there will certainly be a lead time for the newly created DevOps team to get up to speed with continuous integration, test and release automation. Since applications are running in remote VMs (public cloud), there is an argument that businesses have less control over their environments. This may be true in some cases but again proper research should lead to a partnership where effective control can be established by the cloud consumer using appropriate tools that effectively leverage what the vendor has on offer.

I would like to think that in Part 2 of this three-part blog article I have managed to convey that in most cases the benefits of migrating Dev and Test to the cloud outweigh the drawbacks. In Part 3, I will look at how Dev and Test could be implemented at a fairly high level. There is a plethora of tools available to choose from, free open source, bespoke, bleeding edge whatever route you choose there is almost certainly a tool for the purpose. Integrating them could prove challenging, but that’s part of the fun, right?